Hazardous Materials Injury/Exposure

In medical emergency situations, call 911.

For work-related injuries, follow the Injury/Medical Assistance guidance and
refer to the Human Resources Workers’ Compensation page:

http://hr.ufl.edu/manager-resources/employee-relations/workers-compensation/#reporting

Hazardous (Chemical, Radioactive or Biological) Material Splashed in Eye:

  • Immediately flush with gently flowing, potable water for at least 15 minutes. Use emergency eyewash to do this if available.
  • Forcibly hold eye open to ensure effective rinsing behind eyelids. Have injured worker move eye side-to-side and up-down during rinsing. Remove contact lenses.
  • Report incident to supervisor.
  • Always obtain medical attention for a hazardous material splash to the eye. 

Biological Spill On Body:

  • Remove contaminated clothing.
  • Wash exposed area with soap and water for 5 minutes.
  • Place contaminated clothing in a red biohazard bag for decontamination.
  • Report incident to supervisor and Biological Safety Office (352) 392-1591.
  • Obtain medical attention as required. 

Radiation Spill On Body:

  • Confine the movement of all personnel potentially contaminated to prevent the spread.
  • Remove contaminated clothing.
  • Rinse exposed area thoroughly with water.
  • Place contaminated clothing in plastic bag for decontamination.
  • Report incident to supervisor and Radiation Safety Office (352) 392-7359.
  • Obtain medical attention as required. 

Chemical Spill On Body:

  • Do not attempt to wipe chemicals off clothes. Quickly go to safety shower or other water source. Remove contaminated clothes, shoes, jewelry, etc while rinsing.
  • Flood exposed area with running water for at least 15 minutes.
  • Place contaminated clothing in plastic bag for decontamination.
  • Review MSDS or call Poison Information Center (800) 222-1222 to determine if any delayed/systemic effects could be expected (e.g. phenol)
  • Report incident to supervisor.
  • Obtain medical attention as required or if any evidence of chemical burns.

Source: UF Environmental Health & Safety

Version Date: 06/07/2012